HALPATE

Director:

Adam Piron, Adam Khalil

14'

2020

USA

Considered a staple of Florida tourism, alligator wrestling has been performed by members of the Seminole Tribe for over a century. A profile of the hazards and history of the spectacle through the words of the tribe's alligator wrestlers themselves, and what it has meant to their people's story and survival.

“As of 2015, the Mikasuki language was spoken by approximately 290 Miccosukee and Seminole people in the southern Florida region. In their language, the word ‘halpate’ means ‘alligator’, and the alligator itself is a symbol of both historic freedom and independence, and economic stability. For the last hundred years, alligator wrestling has been a means of survival for the Seminole Tribe, and in Khalil and Piron’s disquieting non-fiction, they interrogate the tensions between history and modernity, as tradition bridges spectacle into the 21st century.”
— Tom Grimshaw

Showing in:

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION: The Greatest Show On Earth

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